Resources

Papers

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    IT Service Management Monopoly – Don’t Make ITSM Tool Selection a Game of Chance

    The approach of many organisations when selecting an IT service management solution is like a game of Monopoly. They start at GO with little or no preparation and are then faced with a plethora of available tools to choose from, just like the mass of properties on the Monopoly board. They have no idea how to play the game and shop on the ‘right’ side of the street. Selecting an ITSM tool should not be a roll of the dice. This paper aims to equip the reader with the steps needed to ensure that the right tool for the right price, that meets the needs of the business, is selected.

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    The BYOD Revolution Means ITSM Evolution

    The adoption of Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) practices in the enterprise is gathering momentum. By 2016, Gartner predicts 38% of companies will have stopped buying devices for employees; by 2017, half of employers will require their employees to supply their own devices; and by 2020 85% of companies will have some sort of BYOD program. This paper explores how IT Service Management (ITSM) can support the BYOD movement and also what the emerging trend means for ITSM.

    This is the paper supporting Karen’s itSMF Australia conference LEADIT14 presentation.

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    ITSM Solutions and Organisational Change Management

    I was recently asked by a ITSM tool vendor why tool implementation projects should include organisational change management (OCM). I have also seen many well run ITSM tool projects fail due to the lack of integrated OCM. This paper explores the need for OCM as an integral part of the project. It discusses the benefits to be gained from using OCM to prepare the organisation for the changemanage the change and reinforce the change to ensure it becomes embedded into the fabric of the organisation and ROI is recognised.

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    The State of Change Management

    Forrester research (2011) revealed the poor state of change management in the majority of organisations surveyed. This paper explores the reasons that change management is failing in so many organisations and the actions that need to be taken to rectify the situation.

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    Balanced Diversity – A Portfolio Approach to Organisational Change

    This paper presents a new and innovative framework for embedding IT Service Management change into organisational culture. The framework is a result of the research commissioned by the Network for Business Sustainability (NBS) and undertaken by Dr. Stephanie Bertels, Daniel Papania and Lisa Papania at Simon Fraser University. This framework will be an invaluable addition to the toolkit of every change leader. The book of the same name that provides in-depth application of the framework to ITSM is available from your local itSMF bookstore.

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    A 4-Letter Acronym Sending CIOs Running Scared – BYOD

    A 4-LETTER ACRONYM SENDING CIOS RUNNING SCARED – BYOD
    WHAT THIS MEANS FOR THE OTHER 4-LETTER ACRONYM – ITSM
    Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) or Bring Your Own Computing (BYOC) is being embraced by some organisations and making others break out in a cold sweat. BYOD is here now and is not going to go away – in fact it is already happening – and therefore organisations need to prepare for, and manage the situation. This paper discusses what this means for IT Service Management (ITSM).

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    Armed and Extremely Dangerous – The Service Catalogue is More Than Just a Tool

    Despite the well-used phrase ‘a fool with a tool is still a fool’ there are still many service catalogue initiatives that start and end with the selection of technology. These initiatives are doomed for failure. Armed with technology alone will be extremely dangerous to the success of your service catalogue. This paper discusses how to implement a successful service catalogue with technology selection a crucial component but one of many critical success factors.

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    Why SLAs Fail

    There is an inordinate amount of articles and presentations available on the internet (and elsewhere) entitled “Why Service Level Agreements Fail”?

    So if there is so much guidance to prevent SLAs from failing, why is it that they still do?

    It is my belief that it is not the SLA itself that fails, (that is just a document), but the Service Level Management process and its implementation that causes the failure.

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